Proposal Title

The Ethics of Online Teaching

Length of Presentation

100 minutes

Start Date

15-10-2021 2:00 PM

End Date

15-10-2021 3:50 PM

Document Type

Panel Discussion

Abstract

Conversations related to ethical issues in education are often discussed in all modalities of teaching. Online teaching can magnify the ethical concerns we experience as faculty and students. In this session, we will engage in a discussion on issues of equity, surveillance, and identity in an online environment.

Description

Conversations related to ethical issues in education are often discussed in all modalities of teaching. Online teaching can magnify the ethical concerns we experience as faculty and students. In this session, participants will engage in a discussion on issues of equity, surveillance, and identity in an online environment. Topics covered in the session will include dilemmas surrounding exceptions for students’ late work, student engagement in synchronous and asynchronous settings, unique considerations in synchronous teaching and learning, and exam proctoring. Following an introduction by our presenters of the potential ethical dilemmas inherent in each of these overarching topics, the workshop participants will be dispersed into four breakout groups, each facilitated by a presenter, where they will discuss the most pressing dilemmas they have faced, their thoughts about when these ethical issues have come up in their own teaching, and what their approaches to dealing with these issues have been. After discussing in breakout groups for thirty minutes or so, the entire group will come back together for a debriefing during which members of each group will report out their conversations. Finally, the group will be left with a couple more topics for further consideration as they continue to teach online, including ethical issues with planning and developing online courses and whether learning outcomes can be translated from face-to-face to online learning environments.

Speaker Information

Dan Cabrera serves as the Multimedia Coordinator in the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at Northern Illinois University. He consults with faculty to integrate new multimedia/communication technologies and pedagogical approaches into their curriculum. He has earned a M.S. and Ph.D. from the UCLA School of Public Health and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses on ethics in public health. He also is a Quality Matters Peer Reviewer of online courses.

Jason Rhode is executive director of the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning as well as associate professor of instructional technology in the Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment. In his role Jason serves as chief online learning officer and provides direction for the CITL and oversees all of its operations.

Stephanie Richter is director of teaching excellence and support in the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, where she oversees the center’s programs and services to support faculty, instructors, and teaching assistants with teaching, online teaching, and integrating technology in teaching.

Amanda Smothers is the Teaching and Learning Coordinator in the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning at NIU. She consults with faculty on pedagogical issues and the intentional use of instructional technology. Amanda earned her Ph.D. in English from NIU in 2016 and has been teaching college English for nearly thirteen years, including almost nine years of online teaching. She has also served as an invited virtual speaker on online teaching at the DeKalb Public Library and is a Quality Matters and OSCQR Peer Reviewer of online courses.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Oct 15th, 2:00 PM Oct 15th, 3:50 PM

The Ethics of Online Teaching

Conversations related to ethical issues in education are often discussed in all modalities of teaching. Online teaching can magnify the ethical concerns we experience as faculty and students. In this session, we will engage in a discussion on issues of equity, surveillance, and identity in an online environment.