Date of Award

1974

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Author's Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Frank E. Hustmyer, Jr.

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of certain possible prognostic variables and the success or failure of 41 adolescent girls in adjusting to the community after being discharged from a mental health institution. The possible prognostic variables were divided into three sets: individual variables, institutional variables, and community variables. The individual variables were (1) time of onset of the problem: (2) peer group involvement as shown by amount of time spent with peers and age of peers: (3) probationary status prior to admissions: (4) academic achievement level at discharge as shown by grade level and reading level: (5) preinstitutional school adjustment as shown by grade repetition and truancy. Two institutional variables were explored: the involvement of discharge placement with the program's staff and the staff's perception of the therapeutic program's success or failure with the subjects. The community variables explored were the type of living situation the subjects returned to and the program's staff involvement in follow-up. The data was collected from the institution's records and contact with community sources.

The statistical analysis revealed that seven of the 12 variables were significant: The significant variables were (1) time of onset of problem: (2) age of peer group involvement: (3) probationary status: (4) grade repetition before admission: (5) truancy: (6) the program's staff's perception of the success or failure of the individual subject: and (7) the program's staff involvement in follow-up.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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