Graduate Program

College Student Affairs

Date of Award

2017

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Author's Department

Counseling and Student Development

First Advisor

Jennifer L. Sipes

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine students' engagement and stress levels at Eastern Illinois University, a Midwestern mid-sized regional comprehensive university. The two statistical hypotheses for this study were: "Is there a significant difference in the stress levels reported by students involved in at least one RSO and students who are not involved in a RSO?" and "Is there a significant difference in the stress levels reported by students who are employed at least 6 hours per week and students who work less than 6 hours per week?" The Student-Life Stress Inventory was used to measure students' overall stress. There were 168 surveys collected, 161 of which were deemed useable. An independent t-test was conducted. Research findings failed to reject the first null hypotheses and rejected the second null hypotheses. The results indicated that students who work at least six hours per work have higher stress than students who work less than six hours per week. There was no statistical significance found between the stress levels of students who are involved in at least one RSO and students who are not involved in a RSO. Recommendations were made regarding how students can manage stress and how student affairs professionals can help students manage their stress. Also, recommendations were made for future research.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Share

COinS