Date of Award

1988

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Author's Department

Communication Disorders and Sciences

First Advisor

Robert M. Augustine

Abstract

The literature on language acquisition and the treatment of language disorders in children has been dominated by two variables. These variables are imitation and modeling. Research regarding the best technique for eliciting, generalizing and changing overall language performance in children has been inconclusive.

This study compared the effectiveness of three language intervention strategies: imitation, modeling, and a combination of imitation and modeling in eliciting and generalizing basic concepts and improving pre and post treatment scores on three standardized tests. Six language delayed kindergarten children served as subjects. The subjects were seen twice a week for five weeks.

No significant differences were found among the three treatment techniques in eliciting or generalizing the seven basic concepts trained. No significant differences were found among pre and post treatment scores of the three standardized measures when compared among the strategies. The standardized measures were the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised, the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts-Revised, and the Developmental Sentence Score.

These findings suggest that imitation, modeling and a combination are all effective intervention strategies. The model of the sessions were consistent for all of the strategies. The results suggest that the organization of the four part model and the efficient time use may have contributed to the overall effectiveness of intervention rather than the specific intervention strategy.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Share

COinS