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Abstract

As faculty collective bargaining reaches the half-century mark, the authors take a critical look at what has or has not worked at the bargaining table; how the early expectations of what faculty bargaining would bring to the academy have or have not been realized; and what the future holds, both in terms of process and the substantive issues that will be brought to the table. Dr. Julius has been a faculty member, administrator and employer representative in negotiations at many institutions; Mr. DiGiovanni has served a labor counsel and has negotiated with faculty unions at numerous institutions since the late 1970s. Both share their retrospective on what is new today and what has not changed over that time.

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